Tuesday, July 23, 2013

Curryosity

Keema Curry

 

_DSC0513To say that curry (curry rice) is a national Japanese food is not an over statement. The British Empire once colonized India, and developed Indian curry stew into their own flavor. England’s C&B curry powder landed in Japan in early Meiji Era but some elitists already knew of ‘curry’ existence as early as the Edo Shogunate Era. Japanese curryosity (just kidding) transformed curry to appeal to the Japanese taste.._DSC0510  

Since House Foods Inc. developed home friendly curry roux in 1926,  made ‘Rice Curry’ a household name. Many other solid curry roux are available now days yet I still favor the revolutionized, not spicy - until then we had mind set of curry equal spicy - House Vermont Curry (1963) and remember the old commercial song – apple and honey, House Vermont Curry! Appearing in a curry commercial is a barometer of a star’s popularity. In1997 baseball phenomenon Ichiro did his gig here

Keema is Indian word for minced meat and keema curry is happening in Japan! I once served this dish at a luncheon and it was well received. This recipe also adapted and Japan-nized . I highly recommend of adding diced fresh tomatoes. They add terrific zing to the dish…I wish tomatoes in our garden are ripe already. Anyhow, I believe Japanese curryousity going strong?_DSC0512

Ingredients and how to for 5-6 servings_DSC0468

  • 1 large onion minced
  • 3-5 cloves of garlic minced
  • Ginger roots minced about 3 Tablespoons
  • 3-4 fresh shiitake mushrooms caps only minced_DSC0472
  • Olive oil 2 Tablespoons
  • Ground beef 1 pound
  • Ground pork 1 pound
  • Curry powder 4-5 Tablespoons_DSC0482
  • Red wine 50cc
  • Tomato Juice 2 cups
  • Chicken broth 150cc
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  • Curry roux (solid type) 1-2 square
  • Soy sauce 1-2 teaspoons
  • Salt to taste
  1. Heat olive oil in a large pan, sauté onion, garlic, ginger until the onion is transparent, about 10 minutes.
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  2. Add shiitake and sauté for additional 5 minutes._DSC0485
  3. Add both ground meats and sauté for 3-4 minutes._DSC0490
  4. Sprinkle in curry powder, add the red wine, tomato juice and chicken broth. Simmer for 20 to 30 minutes on low heat – most of liquid is gone at this stage
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  5. Turn off heat and add soy sauce and  curry roux then stir to dissolve.
  6. Put the pan on the burner again to cook for 3-4 minutes on low heat. Add 1 teaspoon of salt if desired. Serve over rice or have it as dip._DSC0564The left over keema curry was made into fried curry rolls. What was I thinking? That was clearly a stupid move on my part, now I must run an extra 5 miles…Not!_DSC0577

In our back yard…

Figs are ripe at last!_DSC0534And roses are releasing its fragrance._DSC0519_DSC0515_DSC0522Chelsea is frequent visitor in our back yard too. My heart stops sometimes; she resembles our late cat._DSC0547

Happy birthday to our grandson who had his 3rd birthday yesterday._DSC0580This painting was done in 2011.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

12 comments:

  1. This looks fantastic... perhaps not ideal in the sweltering heat we're having here right now... something to be enjoyed come autumn time I think for sure though. I can imagine how awesome it must be to break into the egg and have all the yummy yolk dribbling down the sides too...mmmmm :D

    Those curry rolls look so good as well (dare I say even more tempting than the original dish with rice, but probably just because I'm such an addict for fried bread!).

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    1. Thank you so much Charles. You're too kind.

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  2. I must say I'm in awe of your beautiful photos! I struggle so much to make dozens of photos and choose at least one that I can present on my blog... and you have come up with several creative shots! Amazing!
    Thank you so much for sharing the history of Japanese curry. The fried rolls look fabulous. I think I even prefer them ;-) A very creative leftover idea!

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    1. Sissi, Thank you for your compliment but I'm really not good with taking photos. I must say...a little better than I started so there is hope, right?

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  3. Love, love, love your photos. Your fig shot is amazing. Your small-size pictures for direction is neat. Oozing curry roll is sinful. Your plating, as always, is impeccable. Please move to Hawaii so that I can watch you in action.

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    1. Thank you so much. I love these bracelets. I can't wait for your return I missing you already.

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  4. Pretty tasty curry recipe,
    This kinda dish used to called ragout curry an eaten with rice cake in my place...

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    1. Thank you so much. Your blog is amazing!

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  5. My kid's school serves Keema Curry pretty often and my kid loves it. I tried this curry(store bought) once and it was good. Thanks for the recipe.

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    1. Thank you Tataya. I love keema curry but try not to make too often though. I eat too much of it. Your Shrimp fat fried rice sounds good tonight.

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  6. Lovely post and good to know more about history of curry. My hubby is a big fan. I love that you put an egg yolk with your curry rice (I do the same with a Chinese Mince beef dish all the time). YUM. You have lovely figs at home, how nice. That reminds me of visiting my In-Laws soon to pick my own. :P

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    1. Thank you very much. I'm interested to know your Chinese Mince beef recipe...sounds so good!

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